Acupuncture

Ashley Will L.A.c, MSOM
Ashley is a Nationally Board Certified, Licensed Acupuncturist and Herbalist specializing in Acupuncture, Herbal and Nutritional Therapies. She holds three degrees including a Bachelors Degree in Nutrition for Dietetics from Georgia State University, a Bachelors Degree in Health Sciences and a Masters Degree in Oriental Medicine from East West College of Natural Medicine.

Acupuncture is an alternative medicine methodology originating in ancient China that treats patients by manipulating thin, solid needles that have been inserted into acupuncture points in the skin. According to Traditional Chinese medicine, stimulating these points can correct imbalances in the flow of qi through channels known as meridians. Scientific research has not found any histological or physiological correlates for qi, meridians and acupuncture points, and some contemporary practitioners needle the body without using the traditional theoretical framework.
Current scientific research indicates that traditional forms of acupuncture are more effective than placebos in the relief of certain types of pain and post-operative nausea. Other reviews have concluded that positive results reported for acupuncture are too small to be of clinical relevance and may be the result of inadequate experimental blinding, or can be explained by placebo effects and publication bias.


The invasiveness of acupuncture makes it difficult to design an experiment that adequately controls for placebo effects.  A number of tests comparing traditional acupuncture to sham procedures found that both sham and traditional acupuncture were superior to usual care but were themselves equivalent, findings apparently at odds with traditional theories regarding acupuncture point specificity.


Acupuncture's use for certain conditions has been endorsed by United States National Institutes of Health, the National Health Service of the United Kingdom, the World Health Organization, and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.  Some scientists have criticized these endorsements as being unduly credulous and not including objections to or criticisms of the research used to support acupuncture's effectiveness.


There is general agreement that acupuncture is safe when administered by well-trained practitioners using sterile needles and carries a very low risk of serious adverse effects.

 

Q.  What is acupuncture?
A.  Acupuncture is a form of Chinese Medicine that has been used successfully for over 3,000 years. It involves the insertion of extremely thin needles at strategic acupuncture points along the body. Other treatment modalities in Chinese Medicine include nutrition and herbal therapy, cupping, tuina and guasha.

Q.  How does acupuncture work?
A.  Chinese medicine as a whole is based on the concept of balance which is often seen symbolized by yin and yang. Acupuncture is based on the theory that we all have a vital energy called Qi, pronounced “chee”. This Qi flows throughout the body along meridians that connect to all of our major organs, much like the nervous system. According to Chinese medical theory, when the Qi is unbalanced or blocked pain or disease develops. Acupuncture encourages natural healing by applying very fine needles to specific points located along these meridians in order to access the Qi, balancing it or unblocking it to restore health. Modern research has proven the efficacy of acupuncture, but more research is needed to further explain just how acupuncture works from a scientific standpoint. So far, researchers have identified that acupuncture triggers a release of chemicals called endorphins that naturally relieve pain and promote feelings of well-being.

Q.  What does Acupuncture treat?
A.  Acupuncture is very effective for pain relief, but it also used to treat a wide variety of other medical conditions. Based on research, the World Health Organization (WHO) has listed several conditions known to be treatable by acupuncture and Oriental medicine including:

Q.  What is acupuncture?
A.  Acupuncture is a form of Chinese Medicine that has been used successfully for over 3,000 years. It involves the insertion of extremely thin needles at strategic acupuncture points along the body. Other treatment modalities in Chinese Medicine include nutrition and herbal therapy, cupping, tuina and guasha.

Q.  How does acupuncture work?
A.  Chinese medicine as a whole is based on the concept of balance which is often seen symbolized by yin and yang. Acupuncture is based on the theory that we all have a vital energy called Qi, pronounced “chee”. This Qi flows throughout the body along meridians that connect to all of our major organs, much like the nervous system. According to Chinese medical theory, when the Qi is unbalanced or blocked pain or disease develops. Acupuncture encourages natural healing by applying very fine needles to specific points located along these meridians in order to access the Qi, balancing it or unblocking it to restore health. Modern research has proven the efficacy of acupuncture, but more research is needed to further explain just how acupuncture works from a scientific standpoint. So far, researchers have identified that acupuncture triggers a release of chemicals called endorphins that naturally relieve pain and promote feelings of well-being.

Q.  What does Acupuncture treat?
A.  Acupuncture is very effective for pain relief, but it also used to treat a wide variety of other medical conditions. Based on research, the World Health Organization (WHO) has listed several conditions known to be treatable by acupuncture and Oriental medicine including:

Q.  What can I expect during a treatment?
A.  During your first consultation, the practitioner will collect a complete history and detailed evaluation of your condition. They will ask questions relating to many different aspects of your life, not only the condition for which you are seeking treatment. The practitioner will then take your pulse, examine your tongue, and sometimes palpate your abdomen or check for tender areas along the meridians. Once the needles are inserted the patient is to relax for approximately 20 minutes. The practitioner may prescribe an herbal formula or administer other forms of therapy such as cupping or guasha.

Q.  How can I prepare for my session?
A.  It is best to eat a light meal before your appointment so that your body has energy to work with. Sometimes a person who has not eaten for a long period of time will feel lightheaded or weak when receiving an acupuncture treatment. It is best to wear shorts or loose clothing so that the arms and legs below the elbows and knees, as well as the abdomen, are accessible. Do not engage in strenuous activity, drink alcohol, smoke excessively, or ingest heavy meals before or after your treatment. This will allow the body to adjust to the effects of the acupuncture.

Q.  Will my insurance cover Acupuncture?
A.  There are a growing number of insurance companies which cover acupuncture. In the DC area especially since Federal Insurance plans tend to offer coverage. To be sure, you should examine your personal policy or call your insurance provider. We can assist you with this if you’d like. Then at your appointment you may request a Superbill which will contain all the necessary information for you to file with your insurance company so that they may reimburse you directly.

Acupuncture consultation and one session 60 min, $150

​Individual session 60 min, $95

A type of alternative medicine that treats patients by insertion and manipulation of solid, generally thin needles in the body. Its general theory is based on the premise that bodily functions are regulated by the flow of an energy-like entity called qi. Acupuncture aims to correct imbalances in the flow of qi by stimulation of anatomical locations on or under the skin called acupuncture points, most of which are connected by channels known as meridians.

A consultation is required.